What Does Disability Look Like?

According to a recent study, 9 out of 10 people would challenge someone using a disabled toilet if they showed no visible signs of disability.

This is a sorry statistic, suggesting that most people think “disabled” means “in a wheelchair”. This, of course, is compounded by the sign on most disabled toilet doors:

blue and white disable logo

In reality, disabled people look just like me or you. Sure, some use chairs or sticks, but innumerable people have invisible disabilities.

I happen to have a disability that’s sometimes invisible, sometimes visible and sometimes definitely audible. However, I do not use a wheelchair or sticks, even when my legs do get a bit wobbly. That said, if my legs were ticcing a lot, I would like to think I could use the accessible toilet without someone telling me off for it.

Illustrating disabilities is difficult. So often, when you read an article about depression, the stock photo used is of someone, face ashen, wistfully gazing out the window. Like this:

woman touching her forehead

I don’t know about you, but I don’t tend to do this when I’m depressed. When I’m depressed, I can actually smile, laugh and look like I’m having the time of my life. Like this:

6c6933bd-1c13-4ed1-9915-08dee5cf186f

It’s probably about time we stopped thinking of equating “disability” with “wheelchair”. It is, and has always been, a bit bigger than that.