What Are You Laughing At?

laughing

The other day – I had a catch up with someone I used to know. We hadn’t seen each other in almost a year. During our meeting. I told him about what I’d been up to, the jobs I’d been working, and the books I’d been reading. I also told him about the months where my Tourette’s had been pretty bad.

“I even had trouble walking,” I said.

“How?” he asked.

“I would just keep falling over,” I said.

My former friend then took this opportunity to laugh as if not being able to walk were the funniest thing in the world.

“I’m sorry,” he said, not sounding sorry at all. “It’s just so funny.”

I was little bit confused. I didn’t remember not being able walk as being funny at all. It was, at the time, incredibly frustrating not being able to get from A to B without staggering all over the place.

But the encounter, and my acquaintance’s reaction, got me thinking. Is Tourette’s funny? In my experience, people certainly seem to think so. Sometimes, I only have to tell people I have Tourette’s and they laugh.

This can be annoying, especially when my Tourette’s is playing up. I have had, in no particular order, tics in my legs which have impaired my walking, tics in my eyes which have impaired my sight, tics in my lungs which have impaired my breathing, tics in my arms which have made me punch walls, tics in my arms which have made me punch windows, tics in my arms which have made me punch mirrors, and tics in my arms which have made me punch my face. None of these have been particularly humorous.

Most of the time, though, people don’t think of these kinds of tics when they think of Tourette’s. When they think of Tourette’s, they think of one thing: coprolalia – the compulsion to utter expletives and other socially inappropriate phrases, something which affects only 10 to 25 percent of people with Tourette’s.

Admittedly, a condition which makes you do something bizarre as swear compulsively does sound quite funny. The problem is, though, that is although it sometimes has a humorous side, coprolalia is more often than not embarrassing, isolating, and downright awkward. Indeed, it would be fair to say that most of coprolalia isn’t funny at all.

Despite all the un-funny tics Tourette’s can throw at you, despite the fact that the condition can be a cause of social isolation, unemployment, bullying, and embarrassment, if you listen out for them, you’ll hear many jokes where Tourette’s is a punchline. For some reason, it is socially acceptable to mock Tourette’s in a way that it isn’t with other disabilities.

Although laughter might be an excellent medicine, the culture of poking fun at Tourette’s has had many negative effects on those with the condition. Thanks to the innumerable Tourette’s jokes out there, the struggles people with Tourette’s go through are laughed off to such an extent that some even go so far as to say they wish they had the condition.

Ultimately, the comedy surrounding Tourette’s is due to a lack of understanding, and it’s this lack of understanding which makes having the condition far more isolating than it needs to be.

 

 

2 thoughts on “What Are You Laughing At?”

  1. No, not funny and really depressing. I can’t think of a single other ailment that someone other than my president might make fun of. I know there is simply a lot of ignorance around the subject, but you’d think *falling over* would give someone a clue about how serious it is. My boss has balance issues and she wipes out from time to time. No one thinks that’s funny. Tourettes is the LAST thing in the world people think it’s acceptable to laugh at.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. You just wrote how I have been feeling since past few months. I’m so sorry that you had to go through such ordeal. Yup, I have had those tics which made me punch into the windows. It’s dangerous and depressing, to say the least. I despise how media has made of mockery of this syndrome, instead of promoting it.

    Liked by 1 person

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