A Tourette’s Survival Guide

  1. A sense of humour.
    For obvious reasons.
  2. Social dexterity.
    Sometimes, Tourette’s is going to land you in the soup. You’re going to shout something mean in the vague direction of someone who doesn’t want to be called something mean. You’re going to make noise in places where it’s frowned upon to make noise. You’re going to accidentally tear down a load of decorations.
    In these situations, it’s important to know when it’s appropriate to explain your condition and how exactly to do so. This is very tricky.
  3. The ability to leg it at any given moment.
    Even if you have explained why you’ve done what you’ve done in painstaking detail, even if you have used the words “can’t help it”, “condition”, “neurological” over and over again, there will be some people who are pissed off that you a) have just told them to piss off, b) just broken their prized possession, or c) just interrupted their production of Hamlet with a grammatically unsound sentence chockfull of surprisingly creative expletives.
    In these instances, run.
  4. The ability to chill out.
    Other people’s attitudes towards Tourette’s can be very annoying. Some people do not understand why people with the condition cannot just shut up. Some people dismiss the condition as literally not existing. Some just treat the condition as a punchline.
    All these attitudes can and will be angering. However, rage is very energy-consuming. It’s therefore important to realise that you cannot change everyone else’s opinion, and that what other people think is beyond your control. In other words, it’s important to chill out.
  5. A propensity towards not being embarrassed even in objectively embarrassing situations.
    For most people, blowing strangers kisses, shouting out “tit” in the middle of the street, and telling cashiers that they’re twats is mortifying. It’s helpful to get over this embarrassment quickly, as it’s inadvisable to live life constantly blushing.
  6. Flatmates and neighbours unperturbed by random eruptions of sound.
    Whenever it’s late and perfectly silent, my Tourette’s invariably decides to shout. Right outside their rooms, too. Right outside where they are sleeping.
  7. Good friends.
    Having Tourette’s is an excellent filtering process. People who can’t handle you having the condition would most probably be bad friends. People who couldn’t care less about you having the conditions would most probably be good friends. Life with Tourette’s can be a little tricky, so it is important to have people with whom you can laugh about it all.
  8. Decent employers.
    I once blew in face the face of my boss, and he was surprisingly chilled out about it. If only that all employers were so understanding. Once, a potential employer told me they didn’t know if I could work with them because of the “duty of care” they had to the customers. That employer was a fool.
    Some people with Tourette’s might need “reasonable adjustments”. For instance, they might need extra breaks so they can tic at will, or to have their desk in a quiet corner of the office. If your boss has no problem with this, then they might be a decent employer. If your boss has a problem with this, then you might not want that job anyway.
  9. A sense of humour
    is twice as important as anything else. Again, for obvious reasons. If you didn’t laugh, you’d cry.

5 thoughts on “A Tourette’s Survival Guide”

    1. I’m the only one in my family with Tourette’s, and it only properly developed when I was about 21, so my mum and dad were spared the task of bringing up a child with Tourette’s. I can imagine it can be pretty tiring though. Thanks for reading 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

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